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Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

Advisory & consultancy: Nigel has been external advisor on research projects across Europe. He welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Amanda is completing a part-time DPhil, alongside working in Initial Teacher Education at Leeds Trinity University.

Her research is focused on understanding tensions, contradictions and conflicts that teachers in disadvantaged schools may experience when they engage in research activity.  Her research focus is influenced by her own experiences of working as a research-active teacher in disadvantaged schools, and recent work in teacher education to support experienced and beginning teachers in developing their own research activities.

One of the aims of Amanda’s research is to construct a framework to support teachers in pursuing research activity and critical scholarship work which articulates with wider social movements to address issues of poverty and disadvantage in schools.

Title of Thesis

Teachers’ perspectives on tensions between policy, practice and research in disadvantaged schools

Publications 

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2017) A ‘usable past’ of teacher education in England: history in JET’s anniversary issue. Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy, 43 (5), pp.616-627.

Nuttall, A. (2016) The ‘curriculum challenge’: Moving towards the ‘Storyline’ approach in a case study urban primary school.  Improving Schools, 19 (2), pp. 154-166.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Learning {Re}imagined: A review.  Primary First, 15, pp. 17-18.

Nuttall, A. and Doherty, J. (2014) Disaffected boys and the achievement gap: the ‘wallpaper effect’ and what is hidden by a focus on school results.  The Urban Review, 46 (5), pp.800-815.

Conference Papers and Presentations

Beckett, L. and Nuttall, A. (2018) “No child is pre-ordained to fail” Teachers questioning policy assumptions.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Newcastle, 11-13 September.

Nuttall, A. and Tobbell, C. (2017) Trainee teachers’ perspectives on practitioner enquiry.  Paper presented at the 8th TEAN Conference: Thinking Deeply about Education, Birmingham, 11-12 May.

Nuttall, A. (2017) Assessment at primary level: quality, comparability and improving secondary readiness.  A perspective from ITE.  Speech at the Westminster Education Forum Keynote Seminar: Next steps for reforming primary education: effective teaching practices, assessment and accountably, London, 18 January.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Deficit narratives and lived realities: whose poverty is it?  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, 27 November – 1 December.

Nuttall, A. (2016) Disenfranchised boys’ reflections on their urban schooling experience: “What a Waste!”.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Philpott, C., Beckett, L. and Wrigley, T. (2016) Collaborative practitioner inquiry: making a difference to urban schools.  Innovation session (school visits and symposium) presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Leeds, 13-16 September.

Nuttall, A., Finn, B. and Beckett, L. (2015) Teachers’ constructions of poverty effects: Their research evidence.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Belfast, 15-17 September.

Nuttall, A. (2014) Teachers’ voice on disengaged boys: the role of one teacher-researcher in an English primary school. Paper presented at the Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and the New Zealand Association for Research in Education Conference, Brisbane, 30 November – 4 December.

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Yoon Young has been involved in a variety of academic and professional projects related to teacher education.

She is currently a member of the Teacher Education and Professional Learning (TEPL) research group at Oxford. Her Doctoral research focuses on teacher education policy and practice in England. The study examines the relationship between individuals’ own objectives, the stated programme goals, and the national teachers’ standards in the operation of the Oxford Internship Scheme (OIS). It also explores the perceptions of stakeholders regarding ideal goals that could drive a re-conceptualised teacher education programme.

Prior to her Doctorate, Yoon Young used to be a social studies teacher and subsequently worked as a consultant for the OECD’s Initial Teacher Preparation (ITP) Study. She holds a B.A. in Social Studies and Geography Education from the Ewha Womans University, and an M.A. in Educational Leadership from the University of Jyväskylä, where she was a grantee of the Korean Government Scholarship for Study Overseas.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Education and Values. His research encompasses belief and values-based questions across education and research, including:

  • Religions, beliefs and secularities
  • Laws human rights and courts
  • Education and professional ethics
  • Educational research ethics

He teaches across several courses, particularly on beliefs & values, philosophies of education and research, and qualitative and mixed methodologies.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Association of Research in Learning and Instruction; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Religionspädagogik in pluraler Gesellschaft, and regularly reviews for: British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Beliefs and Values, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, Religion, and Teachers and Teacher Education.