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Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoskeletal health. He joined the Oxford University Department of Education in July 2015.

Julian Gardiner is working for Professor Edward Melhuish on a number of studies focusing on the potential influence of children’s early home and pre-school / nursery experiences on later educational attainment. These include the Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) project.

The statistical analyses of data from these projects uses methods including multilevel modelling, multiple imputation and trajectory analysis. Other recent work has included research into the educational progress of looked after children.

Julian Gardiner completed his PhD in Applied Statistics / Epidemiology in 2005 at the University of Cambridge. The thesis was on the application of Bayesian methods to correcting measurement error in dietary data in epidemiological studies. Since then he has have worked in a number of roles in the fields of epidemiology and child development / education. In 2006-7 he worked in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge on studies of mental health issues in adolescents. There followed two years at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Population Health working on statistical analyses for studies of infectious diseases and maternal health. In 2010-13 he was employed at Birkbeck, University of London in the Institute for the Study of Children, Families & Social Issues working on modelling data from the Millennium Cohort Study and the National Evaluation of Sure Start. Research included investigating the effects of parental age on children’s physical, social and cognitive development. Since then he has held posts at University College London working on cohort studies of health and ageing in Eastern Europe, and at Imperial College London contributing to research on musculoske