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Viewing archives for Wolfson College

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Research Assistant on the Centre for Global Higher Education ‘Research on Research’ project. She has a strong interest in China’s social science research, global epistemic justice, international relations and politics, and knowledge-power nexus.

Before her DPhil, Lingxuan was awarded with the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology) with Distinction from the University of Oxford. The title of her master thesis is: Toward endogenous research methodologies: A mixed methods study of China’s educational leadership research. The thesis explored emergent terrain of, and the power dynamics underpinning, endogenisation in China’s educational leadership research using content analysis and critical discourse analysis. She also holds a BA in Education at Beijing Normal University in China with first-class honour.

 

Supervisors

Alis Oancea and Xin Xu

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Dr Lisa Cherry is the Director of Trauma Informed Consultancy Services Ltd leading a dynamic and creative organisation that provides a ‘one stop’ approach to delivering on research, consultancy and learning and development. Lisa is an author, researcher, leading international trainer and consultant, specialising in assisting schools, services and systems to create systemic change to the way that we work with those experiencing and living with, the legacy of trauma. Lisa has been working in and around Education and Children’s Services for over 30 years and combines academic knowledge and research with professional expertise and personal experience. Lisa has worked extensively with Social workers, Educators, Probation Workers and those in Adult Services, training and speaking to over 30,000 people around the world including in the US, Australia and Pakistan and across the whole of the UK.

Lisa has produced multiple pieces of research for various settings and Lisa’s own MA research looked at the impact on education and employment for care experienced adults who experienced school exclusion as children in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, Lisa is coming to the end of her DPhil research at The University of Oxford in the Department of Education, asking the research question “How do care experienced adults who were also excluded from school make sense of belonging?”

Lisa is the author of the hugely successful book ‘Conversations that make a difference for Children and Young People’ (2021)and ‘The Brightness of Stars’ 3rd Edition published in June 2022. A new book contract has been signed for publication in 2024/2025 on cultivating belonging.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Trained as a medical doctor following a degree in medicine at the university of East Anglia in Norwich, UK. Now a qualified consultant in major trauma and emergency medicine and fellow of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine (RCEM). Also a military reservist having successfully completed officer training at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, UK. Has a special interest in medical education (both undergraduate and postgraduate) and completed a Master of Studies in medical education at the University of Cambridge, where he explored the feasibility of a fully virtual medical school. Currently an honorary senior lecturer at King’s College London working with undergraduate medical students.

My DPhil studies explores the perceived barriers and individual challenges of black minority doctors and their representation at senior management level in the UK national health service (NHS), and the wider societal implications.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Debbie Aitken

Lingxuan Chen is a Clarendon Scholar and is currently studying for a DPhil in Education at the University of Oxford. Her thesis focuses on the endogenisation of China’s social science research and the underpinning power dynamics. Her doctoral research is fully funded by the Clarendon Fund Scholarship.

Lingxuan is a DPhil student in Department of Education, University of Oxford. She also works as a Re