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Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is interested in the research contribution of Indian universities to the economic and social development of the country.

Outside of Oxford, Minto is a Senior Consultant with the Nous Group, providing advice to private and public sectors and works extensively with UK higher education institutions. He has worked across Australia and the UK in strategy and advisory roles in health and higher education, and writes frequently on these issues for mainstream media outlets in both these countries. Minto also holds a Masters in Health Administration and Bachelor of Psychological Sciences from Monash University, Australia.

 

Darta is a DPhil student pursuing research in the field of global higher education.

Darta has a diverse academic and professional background. She holds a 1st class BA(Hons) degree in Finance and Business and a MSc in Education (Leadership and Policy). She has strengthened her academic achievements through research assistantships as well as working in financial accounting. Her journey has developed a global perspective and instigated academic curiosity regarding university global engagement.

Darta is particularly interested in understanding global flows within higher education as well as addressing the gap in literature on what constitutes a global higher education institution. Darta’s research explores global universities as through the lenses of social space and social networks. Her approach will employ creative, grounded methods to understand the global imaginary.

Lisa Cherry is a First Year Full Time DPhil Student based in The Rees Centre.

An Author, Trainer and speaker on Trauma, Recovery and Resilience, Lisa brings 30 years of experience working in education and social care settings. In the last ten years, Lisa’s work has been focused on creating and delivering training across all sectors, Education, Social Care, criminal justice and health, with the sole aim of contributing to the facilitation of developing services that can create better life chances for children who are considered to be vulnerable.

Lisa’s research in her MEd looked at the intersection of school exclusion and being in care and the impact upon education and employment across the life course.

Publications
  • The Brightness of Stars; Stories of adults who came through the care system, 2016 KCA Publishing
  • Conversations that Make a Difference for Children and Young People: Relationship-Focused Practice from the Frontline, 2021 Routledge

Katherine is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow writing a comparative critical biography of Paulo Freire, Orlando Fals-Borda, and Muhammad Anisur Rahman.

She teaches life-writing and qualitative research methods and is a Fellow of the Oxford Centre for Life-Writing.

Lesley Nelson-Addy is a PGCE English Curriculum Tutor and is also a Supervisor on the Masters in Learning and Teaching course, following her completion of her MSc in 2018.

Lesley is currently completing her PhD in Education and she is looking at the experiences of Black British students who study English at elite institutions across the UK. Lesley taught English in two local Oxfordshire state secondary schools for five years, having completed her PGCE at the Department of Education in Oxford. In addition to her teaching of students through GCSE and A Level English Language and Literature, Lesley has also been a professional programmes tutor at Oxford University where she teaches on the English PGCE course and is an examiner for the Masters in Learning and Teaching course.

Publications

Nelson-Addy, L., Dingwall, N., Elliott.V. & Thompson, I. (2018) ‘Back to the future: the restoration of canon and the backlash against multiculturalism in secondary English curricula’ in Goodwyn, A., Durrant, C., Sawyer, W., Zancanella, D. & Scherff, L. (eds.) The Future of Englishteaching worldwide and its histories: celebrating 50 years from the Dartmouth conference (London:Routledge).

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Janique is a  Probationary Research Student in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Her current research focuses on children’s learning and the emotional well-being of transnational Caribbean families. As a seasoned educator she has worked at the secondary school level for over a decade and obtained a Bachelor’s in Education from the University of the West. Indies.

In 2015, as a Commonwealth Scholar at the University of Warwick, she completed an MA in Educational Innovation, with distinction. She is a committed community volunteer and leader.  Her research interests remain in understanding how to improve outcomes for children in care and children who are impacted by separation from parents through migration.

Prior to her Doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Minto Felix is a Doctoral student investigating research culture(s) in Indian higher education, exploring disciplinary, institutional, and system-level factors and their interrelationships. He is supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Alis Oancea.

Minto is a graduate of the department’s MSc Higher Education Course, where he graduated with Distinction. He is intereste