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TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-environment/

TITLE OF THESIS
Teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth

My research investigates teachers’ metaphysical beliefs about truth; a matter that has largely been neglected in previous research, which has tended to focus on epistemology. That is to say that, in addition to normative beliefs about the justificatory grounds for truth, teachers will also hold metatheoretic beliefs about the nature of truth in their relative subject disciplines. This research will cast light on the conceptualisations of subjects, and on the relationship between metaphysical beliefs and teachers’ self-perceptions regarding their professional responsibilities.

I have a philosophical background (BA Cantab) and have worked as a teacher of religious education. I have worked as a research assistant for a project, seed-funded by the John Fell Foundation, which investigated the forms of expertise drawn upon in the educational policy decision-making process of the COVID-19 pandemic. I have also worked as an assistant for a project funded by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, which developed and piloted a survey designed to measure stakeholders’ trust in examinations

TITLE OF THESIS
Students’ effort source perception: a lens to examine perceived study effort and judgments of learning

My research mainly uses an experimental design to collect quantitative data through digital platforms. Participants will be asked to complete educational tasks on computers and rate their effort and judgments of learning throughout the process. The experiments are currently being carried out in China. The plan is to finish the experiments by the end of 2022 and start doing data analysis while stay in the field to see if extra data are needed.

Before joining in the DPhil programme in Oxford, I completed an undergraduate degree in Education Studies at UCL Institute of Education and a master’s degree in Educational Research at University of Cambridge. My master’s dissertation explored students’ perceived effectiveness and preference of different types of course assessment. It concluded that course assessments that are related to the skills required by future career in the designated discipline are considered more preferred and effective by students.

Jim obtained a BA in Modern History and a MA in European History from University College London, followed by a MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Birkbeck College London. After this, he completed a PGCE in Secondary History and a MEd in Researching Practice at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded a PhD in Education from UCL. His doctoral research focused on the relationship between academic and school history, particularly in relation to literacy in secondary history curriculum design.

Jim taught and mentored in a number of state secondary schools and sixth form colleges. He was also a part of the Ofsted History Subject Working Group which provided advice on the new inspection framework’s development and implementation. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Historical Association and acted as Associate Editor for the HA’s professional journal Teaching History.

Jim’s research interests focus on history curriculum design, particularly literacy in history education, the relationships between academic and school history, and the interplay between overview and depth in history curricula.

Publications

• Carroll, J. E. (2022). ‘Terms and conditions: using metaphor to highlight causal processes with Year 13‘. Teaching History, 187, pp.40-49.
• Carroll, J. E. (2021). ‘Retheorising national assessment of the narrative mode for historical causal explanation in England’. History Education Research Journal, 18 (2), pp.148–65.

• Carroll, J. E. (2020). ‘Whose genres? Establishing curricular goals for students’ historical writing in England’ Teaching History (HTANSW), 52 (2), pp. 17-20

• Carroll, J.E. (2019). ‘Epistemic explanations for divergent evolution in discourses regarding students’ extended historical writing in England’. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51 (1), pp.100-120
• Carroll, J. E. (2018). ‘Couching counterfactuals in knowledge when explaining the Salem witch trials with Year 13’. Teaching History, 172, pp.18-29
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From divergent evolution to witting cross-fertilisation: the need for more inter-discursive communication regarding students’ extended historical writing’. Curriculum Journal, 28 (4), pp.504-523
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘From ‘double vision’ to panorama: using history of memory to bridge ‘event space’ when exploring interpretations of Nazi popularity with Year 13′. Teaching History, 168, pp.24-36
• Carroll, J. E. (2017). ‘I feel if I say this in my essay it’s not going to be as strong’: multi-voicedness, ‘oral rehearsal’ and Year 13 students’ written arguments’. Teaching History, 167, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Grammar. Nazis. Does the grammatical ‘release the conceptual’? Teaching History, 163, pp.8-16
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘Exploring historical ‘frameworks’ as a curriculum goal: a case study examining students’ notions of historical significance when using millennia-wide time scales’. Curriculum Journal, 27 (4), pp.454-478
• Carroll, J. E. (2016). ‘The whole point of the thing: how nominalisation might develop students’ written causal arguments’ Teaching History, 162, pp.16-24

 

Debbie Aitken (she/her) is Course Director for the MSc Medical Education and a Departmental Lecturer in Medical Education.

She is also Co-Chair of the Equity, Diversity and Belonging (EDB) Committee in the Department of Education, Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) in the Medical School, a Fellow of Harris Manchester College, and a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA).

Prior to taking up her post at the University of Oxford, Debbie was the Director of the Clinical Educator Programme (CEP) at Edinburgh Medical School. She also had numerous roles within the undergraduate medical programme (MBChB) at Edinburgh, particularly in relation to EDI, student wellbeing, and undergraduate and postgraduate Medical Education research projects. She has also worked as a Medical Educationalist at the Royal College of Physicians of London, and as a classroom teacher in a number of schools. Debbie has won a number of awards for her work in EDI and teaching: most recently the NHS Education Scotland Medical Education Award for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Other awards of note are the NHS Education for Scotland Medical Education Award for Process and Development Implementation (for the CEP), and an ASME Travelling Fellowship which led to collaboration and teaching with Yale Teaching and Learning Center and Yale Medical School Department of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Debbie has also worked extensively within the wider international Medical Education community, including the University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Hong Kong Academy of Medicine; and as part of the IDEAL+ Erasmus project at Université de Paris.

Debbie completed a BA in History and English at the University of Stirling, an MA in Language, Literature & Civilisation at Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux III, a Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE) with Qualified Teacher Status in Primary Education at the University of Durham, an MSc in Digital Learning at the University of Edinburgh, and a Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) at the University of Edinburgh. She completed her PhD in Medical Education at the University of Cambridge on ‘Generational differences in perceptions of medical student experiences of clinical attachments in surgery’.

Emma Rawlings Smith is Departmental Lecturer in Geography Education. She teaches on the PGCE Geography and MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, and supervises postgraduate students in the fields of geography education and teacher education.

After completing a first degree in Geography and Biology at the University of Sussex, a Masters in Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy (with Distinction) and a Secondary Geography PGCE both at the University of Sheffield, Emma taught school geography for 15 years in the United Kingdom and abroad. Emma’s disciplinary expertise was recognised by the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) when she became a Fellow (FRGS) and Chartered Geographer in 2009. While working in Abu Dhabi, she gained an MA in Education (with Distinction), and became increasingly interested in practitioner research and professional learning. On return to England Emma completed her doctorate exploring the professional capital of authors who recontextualise knowledge about place in geography textbooks.

Emma has worked in Higher Education since 2016. Firstly, at the University of Leicester as PGCE Geography Lead, SCITT Academic Lead and MSc Educational Leadership module lead. She then moved into the role of Postgraduate Research Lead at Bangor University and further supported research as the School Ethics Chair and CaBan ITE Partnership Research Lead. Emma was awarded Welsh Government funding for a Student Transitions to University project in collaboration with colleagues at Cardiff Metropolitan University. She has published widely on geography education and initial teacher education (ITE) and her research interests focus on teacher education, professional development, teacher and teacher educator identity, student transitions, lesson study in ITE, and place pedagogy. Emma is currently working on an edited volume titled Encountering Place in Education to be published by Routledge in 2023.

Emma has been, and continues to be, involved in a range of societies and associations. She is a trustee and sits on the Council of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS- IBG) as Honorary Secretary (Education) and is a Chartered Geographer assessor. Emma is a member of the Geography Education Research Collective, a member of the Geographical Association’s (GA) Teacher Education Phase Committee and Teaching Geography Editorial Board, having previously sat on the Post 16 & Higher Education Committee (2009-2016). Through her consultancy work with the GA, RGS, the Field Studies Council, NASBTT and Durham Education Service, Emma has supported the professional learning of geography teachers on Data Skills, Changing Places, qualitative methods and geographical enquiry and she has co-authored a number of 11-18 school geography textbooks. Emma has examined GCSE and A level geography for AQA and Edexcel and most recently worked as a GCE Geography Examination Author for OCR. Emma has since served as an External Examiner on PGCE programmes at the University of Reading and Liverpool Hope University.

Current professional associations: British Educational Research Association (BERA);
Royal Geographical Association (with IBG); Geographical Association (GA); International Professional Development Association (IPDA); British Educational Leadership, Management and Administration Society (BELMAS).

Funded Research Projects

Student transitions to university in Wales during COVID-19 Welsh Government funded as part of the National Strategy for Educational Research and Enquiry Collaborative Evidence Network Programme (10/2021-07/2022).

Teacher Drop Out Erasmus+ Programme (2000-2023).

NERC Discipline Hopping (DH) for Environmental Solutions, (12/2021 – 04/2022).

Dr. Gosia Marschall is a Departmental Lecturer and a researcher in Mathematics and Teacher Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

After having taught secondary and post-16 mathematics for over a decade, Gosia completed her MEd in International Perspectives in Mathematics Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge. Following that, during years 2016-2021, Gosia worked at the University of Cambridge as a Teaching Associate in Mathematics Education. This involved working with pre-service secondary mathematics teachers (on the faculty’s PGCE programme) and with in-service mathematics teachers participating in Teaching Advanced Mathematics professional development programme (co-run by the Faculty of Education and Mathematics Education and Innovation­—MEI charity organisation). During this time, she also completed her PhD study at the University of Stockholm, which concluded in a thesis entitled “Reconceptualising teacher self-efficacy in relation to teacher identity: A longitudinal phenomenological study of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers during initial teacher education”. In 2022, Gosia joined the Department of Education team at the University of Oxford where, while continuing with her research, she teaches on the PGCE and Masters programmes.

Gosia’s main research agenda revolves around the concepts of affect, beliefs, values and identity in Mathematics (Teacher) Education. Her work is predominantly abductive and phenomenological, engaging with qualitative case studies and theory. The main branch of her research focuses on developing understanding of how (mathematics) teachers learn during initial teacher education and throughout their career. By drawing on theoretical and empirical research perspectives from education, sociology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, Gosia pursues the goal of (re)conceptualizing teacher professional learning as a process which integrates teacher knowledge, teacher self-efficacy, affect and agency, and teacher identity; all that while keeping teachers and their professional growth, fulfilment and wellbeing at heart. This work relates further to her research in secondary mathematics teacher actions and decision making in the classroom.

Gosia’s secondary research interest relates to the teaching and learning early algebra. In particular, in her MEd dissertation project she explored Polish teachers’ conceptions and approaches to teaching linear equations.

 

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in Modern Languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education.

Before working with the department, Laura taught French and German at secondary school level. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements. Her doctoral research focussed on in-service languages teachers’ professional learning experiences and needs.

Laura is currently working on a project to compare the nature of instructed second/foreign language learning at secondary school in England, Norway and France.

Laura currently supervises students on the MSc Education (Digital and Social Change) pathway.  Her research interests include the intersection of ethics, learning and technology in marginalised communities.

Laura completed a DPhil in Education with the Learning and New Technologies research group in 2015. She has since contributed to a number of research projects at the Department of Education and the Oxford Internet Institute. A strong advocate of inclusive participatory methodologies and action research, she continues to practice in a school environment, supporting students with Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD).

 

Publications

Hakimi L, Eynon R, Murphy VA. The Ethics of Using Digital Trace Data in Education: A Thematic Review of the Research Landscape. Review of Educational Research. 2021;91(5):671-717.

Denton-Calabrese, T., Mustain, P., Geniets, A., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (2021) Empowerment beyond skills: Computing and the enhancement of self-concept in the go_girl code+create program. Computers and Education Vol.175

Geniets, A., O’Donovan, J., Hakimi, L., Winters, N. (eds) (2021) Training for Community Health: Bridging the Global Health Care Gap: OUP

 

TITLE OF THESIS
Educational Exclusion in Zimbabwe

Thomas is planning a mixed methods study looking at the factors influencing educational exclusion in Zimbabwe. Analysis of national datasets and population surveys will be complemented by school-level studies and qualitative research with excluded youth to provide a detailed and multi-level picture of exclusion in Zimbabwe.

After an undergraduate degree in Physics, Thomas retrained as a teacher and worked as a classroom teacher and in school leadership for 8 years, both in England and in Zambia. During this time, he also worked for an EdTech start-up looking to improve access to electricity through education. In 2020 Thomas stepped out of the classroom to study for an MSc in Comparative and International Education and since then he has worked as an associate lecturer at Goldsmith’s on their secondary science PGCE programme, as a research assistant and teaching assistant for the University of Oxford and as a freelance researcher. He is currently studying part-time towards a DPhil alongside work as a doctoral teaching fellow and as researcher, both in the department and freelance.

PUBLICATIONS
Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2022). Participatory Research and the Ethics of Anonymisation. Education Sciences, 12(4), 260. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12040260

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Hayward, L., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Overview of the Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland Project. 23. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-1-overview.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Fausset, T., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Randhawa, A., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Focus Groups with Stakeholders. 30. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-2-focus-groups.pdf

Baird, J.-A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Randhawa, A., Hayward, L., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Questionnaire with Stakeholders. 75. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-3-main-stakeholder-questionnaire.pdf

Randhawa, A., Godfrey-Faussett, T., Baird, J.-A., Hutchinson, C., Spencer, E., & Wiseman-Orr, L. (2022). Perceptions of Assessment Standards in Scotland: Employer Survey Report 4 of 4. 25. https://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/acm-evaluation-pass-4-employer-survey.pdf

Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). What does success mean to you? Perceptions from across the English education system [MSc, University of Oxford]. https://ora.ox.ac.uk/objects/uuid:837757d5-3fc2-4290-84bb-5f1291fcc776#tweet

Wijetunga, M., & Godfrey-Faussett, T. (2021). Freirean Dialogue in a Digitalised Learning Environment. The Post-Pandemic University. https://postpandemicuniversity.net/2021/11/08/freirean-dialogue-in-a-digitalised-learning-en