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Department of Education

Viewing archives for Theme 1: Language, Cognition and Development

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM education and decolonisation of education policies and curricula in Lesotho. For her DPhil project, Motema is interested in finding out the lived experiences of female Science teachers in Lesotho Secondary Schools especially focusing on the major changes in the Secondary school education system in Lesotho that have happened in the past five years as unique meeting points.

Supervisors

Ann Childs and Judith Hillier

Amy is a DPhil student, funded by an ESRC Grand Union DTP Studentship.

Her doctoral research focuses on the educational provision for separated asylum-seeking and refugee children within the UK context. Alongside her DPhil, she also works for a London local authority’s Virtual School for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, as an ‘Unaccompanied Asylum-Seeking Children Advisory Teacher/Caseworker’.

Prior to starting the DPhil, she completed an (ESRC funded) MSc in Sociology at Oxford University, a MPhil in Development Studies at Cambridge University, and a BA in International Development and Portuguese at Leeds University. She also spent a year studying Social Work at Rio de Janeiro’s PUC University.

Supervisors

David Mills and Ellie Ott

Ling is a third-year PhD student in the School of Chinese as a Second Language at Peking University in China and also a recognised student in the Department of Education at Oxford. My research focuses on teacher education and development, with a specific emphasis on teachers who teach Chinese language worldwide.

Supervisors

Laura Molway and Robert Woore

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

Ivan is currently serving as a Facilitator (Teaching) in the Vice-Chancellor’s Colloquium and as an Editor of the Graduate Inequality Review in the University of Oxford. He has taken up lecturerships in a number of universities in Hong Kong and has run Education, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and Academic English courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Prior to joining Oxford, Ivan received his teacher-training in Hong Kong and his postgraduate training in Linguistics (with a specialisation in pragmatics) at University College London. His research interests include: mental representation of word meanings, language acquisition, educational technology, and ELT pedagogy.

Publications

  • Au, I. (2021). Unwinding the Fantasy: Using Breakout Rooms to Promote Language Exposure and Less-Public Feedback Practices in Online Synchronous Teaching. Paper presented at the PASHE 2021 – EAP Education and Practice: Supporting Students’ Needs, UCL (IOE).
  • Au, I. & Yiu, C. (2021). ‘Identity game’: so you think you are what your Instagram bio says about you. Paper presented at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 23, Hong Kong.
  • Au, I. (2021). The magic of breakout rooms in online synchronous teaching and learning of English. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on English Across the Curriculum, Hong Kong.
  • Choi, T. H., Chan, H., & Au, I. (2018). ‘Now you’re talking’: Teacher preparation through alumni talks in a community of practice. Paper presented at the Oxford Education Research Symposium.
  • Au, I. (2018). Branching out from the tree: Extending vocabulary acquisition with polysemy. Paper presented at HKBU-HU First Joint Symposium on Education 2018.

 

Supervisors

Elizabeth Wonnacott and Victoria Murphy

Hao Wu (吴昊) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and English Medium Instruction.

Hao has been teaching English for academic purposes and English as a foreign language for five years at the university level. He obtained an MA TESOL degree from The University of Hong Kong, an MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching degree (Distinction) from The University of Oxford, and a BA English from University of Science and Technology Liaoning (Anshan, China). His research interests are English Medium Instruction (EMI), English speaking pedagogy, language learner psychology, and educational technology.

Selected Publications

Wu, H. (2019). A corpus-based analysis of TESOL EFL students’ use of logical connectors in spoken English. Theory and Practice in Language Studies, 9(6), 625-636. https://doi.org/10.17507/tpls.0906.04

 

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Gene Thompson

Junlong (Charlie) Li is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics. His research interests focus on English medium instruction (EMI), translanguaging, and language learning motivation.

Junlong obtained his BA (Hons) in English Education at Shenzhen University and MPhil in Education (Research in Second Language Education) at the University of Cambridge with Distinction. Junlong is CELTA-qualified. Prior to his DPhil study, he served as a secondary school English teacher and an IELTS speaking teacher in China.

Junlong has published and reviewed articles in several top-tier applied linguistics journals including English Today, Applied Linguistics Review, the Language Learning Journal, etc. He has also presented papers and posters at many international conferences. Junlong’s DPhil project will explore Chinese students’ motivational dynamics and translanguaging experiences during the transition to EMI higher education from an ecological perspective. He is keen on contributing new insights to second language education research.

Supervisors

Heath Rose and Kari Sahan

Zhuohan (Johanne) has a BA in English from Dalian Maritime University, China, and has won China National Scholarship. She then graduated with a Distinction in MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition from University of Oxford. Before her DPhil, Zhuohan worked for the organizing committee for the Harvard Summit for Young Leaders in China, an initiative that brought liberal arts education from Harvard to China’s top-performing high school students. She also helped evaluate the UNICEF China Child-Friendly School Programme as an RA, focusing on the socio-emotional learning among the Dong ethnic minority groups in Guangxi, China. She also teaches IELTS, TOEFL, and English phonics.

Her MSc research centres on linguistic relativity, specifically the effect of French grammatical gender system on both French speakers’ and learners’ perception of objects. Her DPhil research focuses on English pronunciation teaching and learning among young Chinese kids, particularly emphasising the influence of their mother tongue, Mandarin.

Supervisors

Robert Woore and Faidra Faitaki

Motema studied Neuroscience as an undergraduate at Dartmouth College in the USA and it is one of its courses, found interest in Education.

Motema then worked for various non-profit organisations in Lesotho and South Africa focusing on helping high school students from low SES backgrounds access opportunities to study in HE. In her Masters’ project Motema analysed Lesotho’s 2009 Curriculum and Assessment Policy. This analysis’ findings brought Motema to her current research interests which include gendered STEM