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Department of Education

Viewing archives for Theme 2: Policy, Economy and Society

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural identities and belonging
  • Social mobility and inclusive education
  • Migration studies (educational migration; forced migration)
  • Individual and families’ strategies in tackling impact of inequalities
  • Parenting cultures
  • Cultural identities and music
  • Advanced qualitative, biographical, ethnographic and art-based methods

Publications

Books

  • Nurse, L., Moran, L. and Sidiropulu-Janku, K. (editors) (forthcoming 2023) Biographical Research and the Meanings of Mothering: Life Choices, Identities and Methods. Bristol: Policy Press

 Journal Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor with Professor Edward Melhuish of the Special Issue: Comparative Perspectives on Educational Inequalities in Europe of the Contemporary Social Science, Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences (2021)  Volume 16, Issue 4 (2021), 417-522.​ https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rsoc21/16/4?nav=tocList

Book chapters:

  • Nurse, L., Sidiropulu-Janku, K., Obrovska, J., Gajek, K., & J.Mbiatong. (2022)

The place of religious and non-religious values and beliefs in identities of mothers of young children: Methodological approach and empirical evidence from the European countries. In: Kuusisto, A. (editor): The Routledge International Handbook of the Place of Religion in Early Childhood Education. Routledge

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (2021) The Art of Communication in the Socially Distanced Environment. In: Brown, A., Carbon, F., Chambers, B., Coomes, M., Coudenys, W., Rogers, J., Weyer, D. and M. Wilson (editors) Re-Imagining the Tower of Babel. Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg, pp 137-141.
  • Nurse, L. (2020). Construction of Schooling Time as Part of Mothers’ Identities. In: Schilling and O’Neill (eds). Frontiers in Time Research-Einfuhrung in die interdisziplinare Zeitforschung. Springer VS, 287-310. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-658-31252-7_13
  • Nurse, L, & O’Neill, M (two editions: 2018, 2019). Biographical Research in the UK: profiles and perspectives in: Lutz, H., Schiebel, M. and E. Tuider (editors) Handbuch Biographieforschung. Springer VS.
  • Nurse, L., (2013). Biographical approach in the Study of Identities of Ethnic Minorities in Eastern Europe. In: Mrozowicki, A. and Turk, J.D. (editors) Realist Biography and European policy: An Innovative Approach to European Policy Studies. Leuven: Leuven University Press, Belgium.
  • Nurse, L.& E.Sik (2011) Identity and music. Identity of place and cultural identities of generations. In: Axford, B. and Huggins, R. ( editors) Cultures and/of globalisation, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, p. 171-201

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  • Nurse, L. and Robertson, C. (forthcoming 2022) Hearing and Feeling the Music in Every Step: Musical Walks and Biographical Experience of Lockdown. Irish Journal of Sociology
  • Nurse, L. and Melhuish, E. (2021). Comparative perspectives on educational inequalities in Europe: an overview of the old and emergent inequalities from a bottom-up perspective in: Contemporary Social Science,  Volume 16, 2021 – Issue 4, 417-431.   https://doi.org/10.1080/21582041.2021.1948095
  • Nurse, L. (2016). Identities and a sense of belonging: young Lithuanians and Latvians from ethnic minorities. INTER., Vol., No 12, pp 21-33. http://jour.isras.ru/index.php/inter/article/view/4009
  • Nurse, L., Gibson, A., and Surányi, R. (2016).  Media Consumption and Self-Identification: Hungarian and Slovak case study, in: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group. Volume 23, Number 6, pp. 705-724.
  • Nurse, L., Sik, E. (2012). Zene és identitás, in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp. 3-39 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L (2012). A zene szerepe a magyarországi szlovákok etnikai identitásában in: Pro Minoritate, 2012 tél., Budapest, pp.40-57 (In Hungarian)
  • Nurse, L. (2011). Music in the identities of Ethnic Slovaks in Hungary. In: Slovak Journal of Political Sciences, Volume 11,No3, pp. 249-266, Trnava: The Institute of Social Sciences, University of SS Cyril and Methodius.

International reports:

  • Broekhuizen, M., Wolf, K., Francot, R., Moser, T., Pastori, G., Nurse, L., Melhuish, E. & P. Leseman (2019) (Editors).  Resources, experiences, and support needs of families in disadvantaged communities.INTEGRATIVE REPORT D 2.5 https://www.isotis.org/en/publications/resources-experiences-and-support-needs-of-families-in-  disadvantaged-communities
  • United Nations World Youth Report, 2003.  Consultant.
  • Breen, P. J., Shionnemann, M-E., L. Nurse,L.,  Azzopardi,A.,  Lagree, J-C.& P. Lauritzen (2003) Youth Policy in Lithuania. Report by an international group of experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing
  • Helsingius, U., du Bois-Reymond, M., Nurse, L., Chan, V., Machado Pais, J. &  D. Trestieni Ion. (2001) Youth Policy in Romania. Report by an international groups of Experts appointed by the Council of Europe. Council of Europe Publishing.

Mariela is Postdoctoral Researcher at SKOPE carrying out research for the Nuffield Project, ‘Comparing UK policies, outcomes and inequalities in post-16 education & training.’ Her research interests encompass identity and wellbeing theories, in particular the recognition theory and the Capability Approach, children’s rights and the ethics of care. She takes a multi-disciplinary approach in research, drawing on theories in sociology, psychology, human rights and political science to explore what makes a good life, particularly for young people, in contemporary society.

She holds a doctorate in Social Sciences and a Master’s in International Human Rights Law from New College, University of Oxford. Prior to joining SKOPE, she conducted evaluation research for the Rees Centre, research in social care for  the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and provided policy advice and conducted research with young people in refugee camps for the AMAR Foundation.

She is a former Head of the National Authority for Children’s Rights in Romania (2007-2009) and former Policy Officer for the office of the European Commission in Romania where she was responsible for the EU intervention to reform the child protection system in Romania (1999 – 2006). Mariela is founding member of the Oxford Children’s Rights Network.

She is the author of ‘Voices from the Silent Cradles’ (Policy Press, 2021), a book which sheds light on children’s homes, foster care, domestic and international adoption from the perspective of the young people who experienced these types of care and which has been reviewed as complementing Sir Michael Rutter’s longitudinal study of Romanian born adoptees. Her work has been published in The International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, the British Journal of Social Work and Children and Youth Services Review. Her article ‘Children by Request: Romania’s children between rights and international politics’ has been cited in John Tobin’s ‘The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child: A Commentary’ (OUP, 2019) and in the 2017 report of the UN Rapporteur on the Sale and Exploitation of Children.

Visit Mariela’s website: https://marielaneagu.com

Jiayi Li is a doctoral student in the Department of Education. Her research interests encompass macro-level education policy, students’ self-formation and political identity development in the context of international higher education.

Prior to her DPhil studies at Oxford, Jiayi worked as a research assistant with the Rees Centre on policy mapping and local authority data analytics projects in the UK (PI: Professor Leon Feinstein). Jiayi holds a MSc degree in Comparative and International Education from University of Oxford and a BA degree (double major) with high honours in Educational Studies and Economics from Colgate University.

Her current doctoral research explores how international students from ambiguous territories (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) develop civic consciousness and political identity in Chinese universities with “Chinese characteristics”.

Anding Shi is a Dphil student in higher education at the department of Education and St. Antony’s College. Her doctoral research is fully funded by China Scholarship Council.

Anding’s doctoral research focuses on the policy reform of academic publishing in China and its impact on doctoral education. She also has strong interests in academic profession and the internationalization of higher education.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Anding completed her master’s degree in Comparative Education at the Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University. She also studied as an exchange student in the Faculty of Education and Culture at Tampere University.

Joonghyun Kwak is a postdoctoral researcher in quantitative social science for the project International Student Mobility and World Development.

Joonghyun is a quantitatively oriented, comparative sociologist with a focus on globalisation, international migration, social and educational inequality and survey research methods. Through his research, he strives to contribute to a deeper understanding of how structural and policy changes in the global economy shape social institutions and individual behaviours and attitudes. His current research focuses on three key areas: (1) the impact of international student mobility and migration on social mobility and inequality; (2) backlash against globalization in public attitudes toward immigration and trade policies; and (3) the methodology for ex-post survey data harmonization for cross-national comparative research.

Prior to joining Oxford, he studied for a PhD in Sociology at the University of Connecticut (USA) and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in sociology at The Ohio State University (USA) and as a Senior Research Officer at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex (UK).

Gift Sonkqayi is a doctoral student in the department. He is fully funded by the Clarendon Scholarship and Brasenose college.

He is mainly interested in all things concerning the epistemology of decolonising the university space within and beyond the South African context.

Natalya is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oxford.

Natalya Hanley completed her PhD in the area of Global Citizenship Education at UCL, Institute of Education. Previously, she worked in the NGO sector as an educational development manager, educator and recently as a researcher. She developed and ran educational development projects, including Life-Experience, Global Hand and Global Citizenship Education. Her research interests include the following areas: empathy pedagogy, Global Citizenship Education, development education, global perspectives within formal and non-formal education in post-soviet and Central Asian countries.

She works on the project International Student Mobility and World Development led by Maia Chankseliani.

Publications
  • Hanley, N. (2021) ‘The contribution of empathy-based pedagogy in global citizenship education:
    Kazakhstani context’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 13 (2), 79–93. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.13.2.02.
  • Hanley, N., Ospanova, U., Baimakhanbetov, M. (In press). ‘Development of Functional Literacy in Secondary Education: Thematic Discourse Analysis’. Journal of Science, 1(70), 16-30. https://doi.org/10.26577/JES.2022.v70.i1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (2022) ‘Book review: Global Learning and International Development in the Age of
    Neoliberalism, by Stephen McCloskey’. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 14 (1), 12–14. https://doi.org/10.14324/IJDEGL.14.1.02.
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Global Citizenship Education in Kazakhstan. In D. Bourn (Ed.), Research in Global Learning. London: UCL Press. (Approved to write a chapter in a commissioned book).
  • Hanley, N. (Forthcoming 2023). Empathy and Global Education. In D. Bourn & A. Pasha. ’Global Education’. Bloomsbury Encyclopaedia of Social Justice in Education, Volume 10.

Lyudmila Nurse is an Honorary Research Fellow. A sociologist with over 30 years’ experience of research in education, culture, identities, and international social and policy development consultancy work. Dr Lyudmila Nurse’s research include international comparative studies of social mobility and education, identities and belonging, comparative inter-generational studies of identities, ethnic minorities and migrants, parenting, well-being of families with children and young people, application of advanced methods of qualitative, biographical, mixed methods and arts-based research.

She was Research Fellow and Co-Investigator at the Department of Education and previously held post-doctoral and visiting fellowships at universities of Edinburgh, Warwick, City (London) and was an Honorary Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes University. She also has extensive expertise in European comparative research and development consultancy in social and youth policy of countries of Eastern Europe.  She is a co-editor of the Policy Press (Bristol) book series: Advances in Biographical Research. She is a co-founder and a research director of the Oxford XXI think tank. Lyudmila is currently Coordinator/Chair of the Research Network 03 ‘Biographical Perspectives on European Societies’ of the European Sociological Association (ESA), a member of the ESA Council of Research Networks and of the Cultural, Scientific and Medical Advisory Board of Music Mind Spirit Trust.

At the Department of Education she works in collaboration with Dr Ian Thompson and Professor Harry Daniels associating with the Socio-Cultural and Activity Theory Group.  She was a Co-Investigator in AHRC-funded project Cultural Artefacts and Belonging: A comparative case study of displaced and refugee young people and families in Ukraine led by the Department of Education (2021-2022). In 2017-2019 as Research fellow in the Department of Education she worked with Professor Edward Melhuish and Professor Jaqueline Barnes in the EC H2020 project: Inclusive Education and Social Support to Tackle Inequalities in Society (ISOTIS) in which she led a comparative qualitative study of mothers with pre-school and primary school children from low-income families in two metropolitan areas of England: Greater London and North West England. She also coordinated comparative qualitative study of mothers from low-income families, families with immigrant background and ethnic minority background in ten EU countries: Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Portugal.

Research interests are:

  • Theoretical approaches to cultural id