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Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.

QUALIFICATIONS

  •  B.A. in Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University
  • M.A. in  Developmental Psychology, Harvard University
  • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, Harvard University

RESEARCH

Kathy Sylva’s research interests include:

  • Early childhood curriculum and assessment
  • The ‘effectiveness’ of education in the pre-school and primary phases
  • The contribution of parents to children’s learning
  • Children’s Centres and Family Hubs
  • Supporting parents in behaviour management and learning
  • Reading Recovery and other literacy interventions

Kathy has conducted large-scale studies on the effects of early education and care on children’s development and has led several RCTs to evaluate parenting interventions. She has been specialist adviser to Parliamentary Select Committees and currently advises Ofsted, the Early Intervention Foundation, and the Education Endowment Foundation.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Kathy is a Fellow of the British Academy, the Academy of Social Sciences, the British Psychological Society, and recipient of the British Educational Research Association’s Nisbett Award in 2014.  She received an OBE for services to children and families in 2008 and has honorary doctorates from the Open University, Oxford Brookes, and the University of Gothenburg.

CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

  • PI on ‘Early Years Covid 19 Recovery – Mentors and Experts Programme’ in collaboration with Ecorys, funded by the Department for Education
  • CI on ‘Coaching Early Conversations, Interaction and Language’ With Ariel Lindorff (PI) Sutton Trust

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Terezinha Nunes is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies. She started her career as a clinical psychologist in Brazil and moved to a research career by obtaining a doctorate in Psychology at City University of New York, where she was supported by a Fulbright Scholarship.

Her work spans the domains of children’s literacy and numeracy, including both hearing and deaf children’s learning, and her focus of analysis covers cognitive and cultural issues, with a special interest in educational applications. Her work on “street mathematics” in Brazil uncovered many features of children’s and adults’ informal knowledge, and her subsequent work in the U.K. investigates how this informal knowledge can be used in education. Her literacy research focuses on the connections between morphological awareness, spelling and vocabulary growth. In 2017 she was awarded the Hans Freudenthal award for innovative and influential research in mathematics education, by the International Union of Mathematicians. In 2018 she received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Szeged, Hungary.

Pam Sammons is a Professor of Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.

Previously she was a professor at the School of Education, University of Nottingham (2004-2009) and a professor at the Institute of Education University of London (1993- 2004) where she directed the International School Effectiveness & Improvement Centre (ISEIC) 1999-2004.

Her research over more than 30 years has focused on school effectiveness and improvement, school leadership, teaching effectiveness and professional development, and promoting equity and inclusion in education. She has conducted major studies in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland including the longitudinal Effective Provision of Pre-school Primary and Secondary Education (EPPSE 3+ -16) research from 1996-2014 and the impact analyses for the Evaluation of Children’s Centre’s in England (2009-2015).

She has a particular interest in longitudinal studies and the use of mixed methods research approaches. She has provided research advice to inspection agencies in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Sweden and engaged in the development of educational effectiveness studies in Cyprus, Germany, Norway and Sweden. She was an author of the OECD country report on the Czech Republic (2012). She provided input to professional development of Challenge Advisors in Wales (September 2014) and was an advisor to the DfE for its research on the ‘London Effect’.

She has conducted research on social mobility for the Sutton Trust exploring the drivers of academic success for ‘bright but disadvantaged’ students, and on students’ aspirations. Pam is currently a co-investigator for the OECD TALIS video study on mathematics teaching in England (funded by the DFE) held with the Education Development Trust.

Pam has been a governor of a primary school in Oxfordshire and a governor for a secondary school academy in the city of Oxford.

Please find a copy of Pam’s recent publication list here in PDF format.

Edward Melhuish is Professor of Human Development at the University of Oxford, and Birkbeck, University of London.

He has undertaken research in 12 countries, and is currently undertaking large-scale longitudinal studies in Norway, the UK, and Australia involving family, community and pre-school influences on child development, and policy implications. He is also taking part in an EU-project (ISOTIS) on inequality in childhood involving 11 countries.

His studies contributed to social policy in the UK in the area of families, young children, early education and social disadvantage, including the 1989 Children Act, the 2005 Children Act, 2006 Childcare Bill and policy on childcare, early education, child poverty and parental support in the UK and other countries. He has served as an expert witness to several House of Commons Select Committees, and is a member of a Child Well-being working group of WHO, and the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group Early Childhood Interventions Group. With 300 publications, he has contributed to discussions of social policy for children in Norway, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, Portugal, New Zealand, Australia, Japan, China, Korea, Chile, European Commission, OECD and WHO. He has been a scientific advisor to UK research funding agencies and also to many overseas research funding bodies: NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research); Academy of Finland; Nordic Research Councils for Humanities and Social Sciences; Portuguese Research Council (FCT); European Commission; Australian Research Council; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Council). He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences and in 2016 was awarded an OBE for Services to Social Sciences. Over many years he has acted as an advisor and consultant on a pro-bono basis to many charities and voluntary organisations involved with child well-being, including NSPCC, Save the Children, Action for Children, 4Children, BIG Lottery Fund, Early Years Ireland, Atlantic Philanthropies, National Children’s Bureau, Children in Wales, Early Intervention Fund, and Eurochild. He is a trustee of the WAVE trust and the Foundation Years Trust.

Lars-Erik Malmberg is Professor of Quantitative Methods in Education, at the Department of Education, University of Oxford in the UK.

He started off as a primary school teacher in Finland. He is Docent in Education with particular focus on quantitative methods, at Åbo Akademi University, Vasa, Finland, where he earned his Doctorate of Education. He completed his post-doc at Yale University and enjoyed the prestigious Research Councils UK (RCUK) academic fellowship 2007-12.

He has more than 70 publications (peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and reports). He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Learning and Instruction 2018-21. His current research interests are on intrapersonal approaches to learning processes and modelling of intrapersonal data. He has published on effects of education, child care and parenting on developmental and educational outcomes, and teacher development.

He applies advanced quantitative models to the investigation of substantive research questions in education. He recently completed the ESRC-funded seminar series called “Network on Intrapersonal Research in Education.”

Ariel is an Associate Professor and Research Lecturer in the Department of Education, and is the Course Director for the MSc in Education.

She also leads the Research Design and Methodology pathway of the MSc in Education, supervises MSc and DPhil students, and acts as an assessor across a range of postgraduate programmes in the Department.

Ariel leads and contributes to projects related to educational effectiveness, improvement, and equity, largely in pre-school, primary and secondary phases of education. Methodologically, she has expertise in advanced statistical methods and mixed methods, and an interest in appropriately contextualised approaches to evaluation.

Ariel completed her DPhil in the Oxford University Department of Education. She holds Qualified Teacher Status in the UK, and prior to becoming a researcher she was a secondary mathematics teacher in the USA since 2006. She is also a Chartered Statistician of the Royal Statistical Society, with a Masters in Applied Mathematics and Statistics from Hunter College, City University of New York.