Skip to content

Department of Education

Viewing archives for Academic Staff

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)

Hamish is the Course Director of the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT). He lectures and supervises on the MSc Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) and the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT).

He is director of the International Database of Education Systematic Reviews (IDESR.org), a database of published systematic reviews in Education and a clearinghouse for protocol registration of ongoing and planned systematic reviews. He convenes the REAL (research in EAL) group at the Department. He is co-director of the Oxford Education Deanery.

Hamish’s research interest centres on evaluation of pedagogical approaches to teaching children who use English as an Additional Language (EAL). In particular, his research focuses on the use of the first language as a pedagogical tool for multilingual learners in English medium classrooms. His methodological interest is in randomised trials and systematic reviews. He is also an advocate for user engagement in research and public understanding of science.

Hamish welcomes expressions of interest for doctoral study in the field of EAL, bilingualism and bilingual schooling, international schooling, and instructed language learning. He is particularly keen to hear from prospective students wishing to conduct systematic reviews and experiments in these areas.

Publications

Books

Journal articles

Book Chapters

  • Chalmers, H. & Murphy, V. (2022). Multilingual Learners, linguistic pluralism and implications for education and research. In Macaro, E., & Woore, R. (Eds.) Debates in Second Language Education. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: 10.4324/9781003008361-6.
  • Murphy, V. & Chalmers, H. (2022) The impact of language learning on wider academic outcomes. In K. McManus & M. Schmid (eds.), How special are early birds?: Foreign language teaching and learning, pp. 165-188. Berlin: Language Science Press. Doi: 10.5218/zenodo.6811470

Reports

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

After obtaining a degree and PhD in chemistry at the University of Birmingham, Ann Childs taught science in secondary schools in the UK and West Africa for eleven years, seven of these as a head of chemistry and head of science.

Since 1995 she has been involved in science teacher education at Oxford University where she is a fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Ann would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Explaining science/chemistry in secondary science classrooms – what makes an effective explanation?
  • Interaction between teachers and students in second language classrooms in science where English is the medium of instruction
  • Developing teacher education in science of both pre and in-service science teachers
  • Educating the teacher educators – what is the knowledge base of a teacher educator in mathematics and science?

Heath Rose is Professor of Applied Linguistics, with a specialisation in language teaching research. He is Deputy Director of the Department of Education and Vice-Principal of Linacre College.

After completing a PGCE in 1997, Heath started his teaching career in Australian and Japanese schools. He eventually moved into teaching in higher education, while completing a PhD in Education from The University of Sydney. Stemming from this professional background, Heath’s research interests are situated within the field of language teaching and language learning. His research has included self-regulation and language learner strategies, Global Englishes, teaching English as an international language, and English Medium Instruction. Publications include a number of books on Global Englishes, including Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge) and Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge) in addition to books on research methods, including the Routledge Handbook of Applied Linguistics (Routledge) and Data Collection Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (Bloomsbury). He is series co-editor of Cambridge Elements in Language Teaching.

He has published numerous research articles related to language education in journals such as Higher Education, Language Policy, Applied Linguistics, ELT Journal, TESOL Quarterly, System, and Modern Language Journal. Heath is the coordinator of the English Medium Instruction Research Group, and runs the wider EMI Oxford Research Network

 

Qualifications
  • B.A.H. Linguistics/Psychology – Queen’s University, Kingston On, Canada
  • M.A. Educational Psychology – McGill University, Canada
  • Ph.D. – Second Language Education – McGill University Canada

Victoria Murphy would welcome informal contacts from prospective doctoral students interested in the following topics:

  • Language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/ Language Minority) children
  • Child L2 and bilingualism
  • Foreign language learning in primary school
  • Lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Research

Victoria is active in the following research areas, and would welcome DPhil applications on any of these, particularly those relating to EAL (language minority) children and child L2 learning and foreign language learning in primary school.  She is also the convenor of the Research in English as an Additional Language (REAL) group.  Her research is currently being funded by the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust and Nuffield Foundation.

  • language and literacy development in EAL (ELL/ESL/Language minority) children
  • child L2 learning and bilingualism
  • foreign language learning in primary school
  • cognitive processes underlying L1 and L2 learning
  • lexical development and morphosyntax in L1 and L2 learners
Current Research Project(s)