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Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

Register for the event

Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.

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Children follow natural developmental progressions in learning. Curriculum research has revealed sequences of activities that are effective in guiding children through these levels of thinking. These developmental paths are the basis for Learning Trajectories. Learning Trajectories have three parts – a learning goal, a developmental path along which children develop to reach that goal, and a set of activities matched to each of the levels of thinking in that path. Together, these help children develop to higher levels of mathematical thinking.
In this talk, we will present surprising research findings about early mathematics, including its predictive power, children’s potential for learning, and what we know about effective teaching using research-based learning trajectories. Takeaways include new supports for teaching and learning early math playfully and joyfully.

About the Speakers

Dr Julie Sarama is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Innovative Learning Technologies and Distinguished University Professor, and Douglas H Clements is the Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning and Distinguished University Professor at the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education.

Mirna Sumatic is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her doctoral thesis is focused on student-teacher interactions and child-parent relationship quality.

Her research interests lie particularly in the moment-to-moment perceptions and fluctuations of these relationships and interactions, and how best for teachers and parents to support children’s learning in school and at home. Theoretically, Mirna is interested in applying and integrating attachment and motivation theories to her research.

Prior to starting her DPhil, Mirna completed her BSc in Psychology at the University of Bath and went on to complete her MSc in Child Development and Education at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

***Register in advance***

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected children’s educational experiences around the globe. Turkey was one of the countries that kept schools closed more than 200 days listed to be one of the longest closures across OECD countries (OECD, 2021). Many students had limited access to internet or technological devices, which led to major educational losses for children across the country (Ergun & Arik, 2020). Given these circumstances, policymakers and researchers expect the educational repercussions of the pandemic to be the most detrimental for children, who are at risk for low school achievement. This seminar will present the factors linked with learning losses during the pandemic, demonstrate the estimates of educational outcomes for disadvantaged children in relation to their home learning environments, and evaluate the educational policies and programmes implemented in Turkey. Speakers will also outline what future policies might look like to support children during their return to school. Micro-simulation analyses of existing datasets on pupil outcomes and family predictors from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), and interviews with national stakeholders will inform the findings of the study. The study has been commissioned by the UNICEF Turkey Office and is carried out by Development Analytics.

***Register in advance***

Deficits in different aspects of early language impact on reading in different ways: while phonological deficits are a powerful predictor of later decoding and word-level reading skills, broader oral language skills form the substrate for reading comprehension. This two-dimensional model provides a useful framework for relating spoken and written language difficulties, but raises some interesting questions which Dr Emma Hayiou-Thomas will explore in this talk: what are the sources – in terms of the genetic and environmental etiology – of individual differences in phonological vs broader oral language skills? How does the etiology of these dimensions, and the relationship between them, change over time? Finally, are there other risk and protective factors beyond the language domain, that contribute to children’s reading outcomes?

***Register in advance***

In this talk Dr Paul Ibbotson will discuss his experimental, corpus and modelling work exploring the social and cognitive foundations of language acquisition. In an approach that can be described as developmental cognitive linguistics he aims to show (a) how cognitive bottlenecks can place adaptive constraints on learning and (b) the value-added of integrating social and cognitive development into our models of language development. Examples are drawn from such non-linguistic domains as inhibition, memory, attention, and categorisation to illustrative how their development can shape the course of language acquisition.

 

***Register in advance***

 

There is a common assumption in scientific and policy discourse that, for greatest effect, interventions need to be applied early in life, when children’s brain function and behaviour are thought to be more malleable. Surprisingly, very few studies have tested directly whether common interventions for child development, mental health and behaviour are more effective when delivered earlier, rather than later in childhood. We assess this question using data from multiple trials of parenting interventions in Europe, and updated reviews from around the world, drawing on both individual participant (IPD) and aggregate level meta-analytic approaches. Implications for other fields of child development, and for policy will be discussed.

Siyu is a research associate working on TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education

At TalkTogether, Siyu is responsible for designing online surveys on platforms such as Qualtrics, liaising with international research collaborators and partners, and analysing quantitative data from child assessments and parent reports.

 

Prior to joining TalkTogether, she completed the MSc in Education (Research Design and Methodology), under the supervision of Professor Sonali Nag. Her dissertation explored the roles of family background and home literacy environment in the literacy and language development of a Wales subsample from the Millennium Cohort Study and was awarded a High Distinction.

 

Kate’s current research centres on enhancing informal educational environments to maximise child outcomes. Through this, she hopes to contribute towards gently helping children discover their passions and thoughtfully equipping them to live into their best and healthiest selves, whatever that means to them each day. Her broader research interests include the role of family in out-of-school learning, socio-emotional development, and education-based non-profit evaluation.

The focus of Kate’s doctoral work is to better understand child learning in museum contexts, with a particular emphasis on family visits to the ‘children’s museum’. More specifically, she aims to both identify what impacts such visits can result in, as well as explore how they might be optimally reached; in other words, what about a children’s museum visit makes it a high-quality children’s museum visit.

Prior to beginning the DPhil programme, Kate received her B.S. Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Carnegie Mellon University and her MSc Education (Child Development and Education) at the University of Oxford, for which she conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of museum intervention on parent-child dyadic conversations.

Bhabesh’s research Inquire into the systemic practices in a school to understand the implications of already existing classification of roles, and regulations based on power and control dynamics within the school. Also, focusing on the systemic apparatuses existing in a schooling system, wherein there is a categorical divide between the students
that are the academically poor and the administrative personnel who pose authority.