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Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational frameworks and practices.

Following Danielle’s BSc in Psychology and MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, she founded a social enterprise that merges psychological and academic strategies to guide undergraduate and master’s students study practices. In addition to this, Danielle provided pedagogical and behavioural support across SEN college, secondary and primary schools.

Some of Danielle’s notable work includes her research introducing a new University-wide EDI strategy at her former Higher Education institution, presenting insights and way-forwards on youth homelessness to HRH Prince Williams, and providing discipleship to next-gen leaders.

Ernesto is interested in several aspects of language learning, cognition and education in different international settings, especially in the Global South. He is currently a Research Officer for TalkTogether, a UKRI GCRF-funded research project based at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford.

Ernesto holds a PhD in Psycholinguistics for his experimental and corpus-informed work on the interaction between children’s working memory and subject-verb agreement. He has been employed in different capacities as a researcher/teacher by the Open University (UK), University of Westminster and the University of Havana.

He has acted as a resource person on IDRC-funded large-scale projects led by PI Freda Wolfenden, working with education researchers, experts and stakeholders in Latin America and the Caribbean (Honduras, Jamaica, Argentina, Colombia), Africa (Ghana, Rwanda, Malawi, Kenya) and Asia (India, Uzbekistan, the Philippines, Pakistan, Vietnam).

Publications

Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto and Ibbotson, Paul (2023). Working memory training improves children’s syntactic ability but not vice versa: A randomized control trial. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 227, article no. 105593. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2022.105593

Ibbotson, Paul and Roque-Gutierrez, Ernesto (2023). The Development of Working Memory: Sex Differences in Accuracy and Reaction Times. Journal of Cognition and Development (Early Access). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15248372.2023.2178437

Gimenez, Julio; Baldwin, Mark; Breen, Paul; Green, Julia; Roque Gutierrez, Ernesto; Paterson, Richard; Pearson, Jayne; Percy, Martin; Specht, Doug and Waddell, Guy (2020). Reproduced, reinterpreted, lost: Trajectories of scientific knowledge across contexts. Text & Talk, 40(3) pp. 293–324. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/text-2020-2059

Athina is a Research Officer working on TalkTogether: Supporting Oral Language Development.

The project investigates children’s oral language in multilingual urban poor contexts, with an aim to develop and evaluate an intervention programme for kindergarten classes. TalkTogether is an international collaboration led by Prof. Sonali Nag and involves academic and non-academic partners in India.

Athina completed her PhD in Applied Linguistics at the University of Cambridge being awarded a PhD Studentship from the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics. Before her PhD, Athina obtained a MA in Linguistics from the Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. During her MA studies, she did an internship at the University of Amsterdam where she was involved in testing bilingual children and used the data to write her MA thesis on the occurrence of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of grammatical gender by Greek-Dutch bilingual children. She also worked as a student assistant for three months at the Center for Language and Speech Technology of the Radboud University of Nijmegen with her task being the preparation of a literature overview of the indicators investigated and reported in the literature to predict L2 oral proficiency, as well as, a review of the systems (manual and automatic) used to evaluate speaking proficiency. She holds a BA in Greek Philology from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. During her BA, she also spent an academic year at the University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain as a student being awarded an Erasmus scholarship. Finally, she has a CELTA (Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and has some teaching experience with children and adults in various settings (immigrant populations, undergraduates, foreign and repatriated students).

In her previous research, she investigated age (of onset) and first language effects on the acquisition of English grammar (focusing on finiteness) by Chinese and Russian child learners in a minimal input EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. During her current role, she is involved in various research projects within TalkTogether all focusing on shedding light on child oral language development of (Kannada-speaking) children and/or aiming to support their oral language development through interventions.

Her research interests involve child (second) language acquisition with a particular interest in the development of morphosyntax, the factors both linguistic and contextual that shape it, and the support of oral language development through classroom interventions to help children be ‘readier’ for literacy and school.

 

Conference Papers

  1. ‘Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the EuroSLA 28 conference, Munster, Germany, September 5-8, 2018.
  2. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of age’ (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Age effects in bilingual language acquisition’ in Poznan, Poland, March 7-8, 2019.
  3. ‘The acquisition of finiteness in English by Chinese and Russian speaking children: the impact of L1 (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Paper presented at the workshop: ‘Tenselessness II’ in Lisbon, Portugal, October 3-4, 2019.

Poster presentations

  1. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the Lead summer school for L2 acquisition, University of Tübingen, Germany, July 23-27, 2018.
  2. Age in child L2 acquisition: The case of finiteness (In collaboration with Theodora Alexopoulou, Henriette Hendriks, Ianthi Maria Tsimpli, University of Cambridge). Poster presented at the School on Experimental and Corpus Linguistics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, September 25-27, 2018.

Early Years practitioners across the UK are invited to take part in an evaluation of Talking Time©, an intervention programme which empowers staff to enhance oral language in the early years.

Talking Time© supports Early Years practitioners to deliver engaging, structured, small-group activities to three- to five-year-olds, aiming to enhance early oral language through high-quality interactions and conversations. The programme has been developed by leading academics at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education and UCL’s Institute of Education, and has been shown to enhance children’s oral language and staff practice. An independent evaluation of the programme will be conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, with funding from the Education Endowment Foundation.

The Talking Time© team are seeking 130 settings to take part. Settings allocated to the ‘intervention’ group will receive the programme at no cost. Settings allocated to the ‘control’ group will receive a payment as a thank you for taking part, which they can use to access programme resources once the research is complete.

Dr Sandra Mathers, Departmental Lecturer at the University of Oxford and Talking Time© co-lead, said: “Talking Time© is all about having high quality conversations with children to support their language learning. One of the key features is the flexibility of the programme. The embedded professional development supports educators to adapt Talking Time© to their individual contexts and children”.

Early Years settings in parts of London, the Northwest, East of England, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber are being offered the chance to get involved with the evaluation study. State and private, voluntary and independent (PVI) group settings are eligible to take part.

Professor Julie Dockrell, Professor of Psychology and Special Needs at IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education & Society said: “We hope particularly to work with settings in socially deprived areas, and support them in improving children’s oral language development.”

Want to get involved? Read the information sheet and fill out the Expression of Interest form.

A series of webinars led by Dr Sandra Mathers and the Talking Time© team will provide practitioners with an introduction to the study. See the dates of the webinars and register on the Talking Time website.

Dongxia Nie is a first-year student in the DPhil in Education programme, where her research interests centre on understanding young learners’ English as a Foreign Language (EFL) education through mobile devices.

Dongxia holds a Master of Arts (MA) degree with distinction from the Institute of Education (IOE) at University College London (UCL). Before her master’s studies, she worked for approximately 10 years in EFL teaching and educational consultancy across diverse settings. Her instructional expertise extends to both monolingual and multilingual students, spanning various ages and language proficiency levels.

Supervisors

Victoria Murphy and Faidra Faitaki

A video series, which features our Department academics, is now available online.

The International Commission on Mathematical Instruction, which is a worldwide organisation devoted to research and development in mathematical education at all levels, has been releasing presentations by Hans Freudenthal Award winners.

One such winner is Emeritus Professor of Educational Studies, Terezinha Nunes, who presents four modules about her research.

She said: “This unit was designed to highlight moments in the path that, as a psychologist, I followed as I became more engaged with how children learn mathematics. This path starts with the encounter with findings from my own research that challenged conceptions of ability and pedagogy that were predominant at the time.

“A theme that emerges at every module is the cultural nature of mathematics and the difficulties of trying to coordinate the idea of logical invariants with culture.”

Gabriel Stylianides, Professor of Mathematics Education, and Louise Matthews, Research Project Manager, introduce the series in module zero.

You can watch the videos on ICMI webpages now.

Julia is a Departmental Lecturer in Child Development at the Department of Education.

Julia teaches on the MSc Education (Child Development) and is the module lead for Cognitive Development and Educational Attainment and Core Principles of Child Assessment, and lectures on the Foundation Learning and Wellbeing module.

Julia is also an MSc Research Supervisor and Pastoral Lead.

Danielle is a DPhil student researching how Black-British doctoral students navigate the spaces of the elite, providing a new theoretical framework to understand their agency better.

Her main interests are in Human Flourishing, Cultural Geography, Psychology, and Justice, and her work aims to inform and reform educational